My Newest Mokume Gane Work

I’ve been having a ball playing with scrap clay to make Mokume Gane. Here are some of my newest pieces. You can find the tutorial on how to make Scrap Mokume Gane on my web site.
donut
scrapmgpandant2
scrapmgpandant1
This last one didn’t quite make it to the Mokume Gane part 🙂 I liked the design so much I just used the sheet of clay as it was to make the domed pendant. The bail is also made of clay.
claybail1

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Faux Fun

When I started claying doing faux stone techniques was one of my favorite thing to do. I used translucent clay and added inclusions like embossing powders and dried flowers. Later I tried adding alcohol inks to tint the clay and it worked very nicely. A combination of the 3 would be a great experiment. I’ll have to add that to the list. 🙂

One of my favorite pieces was this inro wearable vessel I made many years ago.

Faux Stone Dragonfly Inro

Faux Stone Dragonfly Inro

The body looks sort of like rough moonstone. The leaves faux green jade, the dragonfly purple jade.

Some of my other works

Faux Bone

Faux Bone


Faux Jade

Faux Jade


More Mokume Gane

More Mokume Gane


Lapis Donuts

Lapis Donuts


Faux Retro Fabric - Barkcloth

Faux Retro Fabric - Barkcloth


turquoise2
Faux Turquoise

I found a great link to many faux tutorials
http://beadyeyedbrat.com/tutesfaux.html

Waste Not Want Not Focal Beads

In a previous post I said I was setting aside the mokume gane shaving for another project. I used the term “waste not want not”, so I figured it was the perfect name for these beads. 🙂

I used black clay as the base and layered those shaving over the surface until I has a pleasing design. On most of the beads that had black clay still showing I textured the black to give the bead an extra kick. I got the inspiration from Kellie’s Robinson’s beads. I haven’t sanded or buffed them yet and I may not. The picture doesn’t do them justice. They are much prettier in person. My favorite is the red/orange/yellow bead. (They are all approx 1″ across, with a single hole straight through the bead)

wnwnbeads

Variations Of The Mokume Gane Technique

I have been using a lot of “junk” clay to make mokume gane and I love the effect I get. A good friend recently sent me a large quantity of junk clay, cane ends and old damages canes so I decided to experiment a bit.

I took several of the old canes, worked them flat and then rolled them through the pasta machine so I had a smooth sheets to work with. (The following are the same steps I used for the scrap mokume gane tutorial) I then spritzed them with water and used a background rubber stamp to texture the sheets. I shaved off the raised areas with a sharp blade and set them aside for another project. (waste not want not) I swear it’s like Christmas morning every time I see what’s under the surface. 🙂 The colors and designs just appear magically. (I guess that’s why Jennifer Patterson called her Polymer Cafe article Hidden Magic) Here are some of the sheets I was able to product using old canes.

sheet 1sheet 2sheet 5sheet 6

You can get nearly the same effect using several colors and extruding the clay. I like the way it has even stripes of colors through the pattern.

Here are some beautiful examples by artists in which the extruded technique was used.

Dominique’s

Dominique’s


Christine Damms

Christine Damm's

If you do not own a clay extruder, I found a nice way for you to get a similar look. Ponsawan over at Silastone used a skinner blend jelly roll to simulate the extruded technique.

Ponsawan's

Ponsawan's


Here’s a picture tutorial by Ponsawan for the Skinner Blend Gane

New DVD – Secret Shapes Inros

Jana Roberts Benzon shows how to make to most amazing Inros. How the shapes come about is the secret and you won’t get that secret out of me. 🙂 I will say Jana is a genius for coming up with the idea. I had a V-8 moment and thought “why didn’t I ever think of that”. LOL The DVD was well worth the money and can be purchased from www.polkadotcreations.com Lisa Clarke, the owner of the online store, is also a polymer clay artist and I like to support artists in the clay community.

I had been in a creative rut, my muse had left me about the same time Winter hit (she hates the cold), then I received Secret Shape Inros as a Valentine’s Day present and it gave me the jolt I needed. I haven’t stopped creating and it feel wonderful to be back in my studio 🙂 Here are 2 heart shaped Inros I made a week or so ago.

Heart Inro 1

Heart Inro 1

Heart Inro 2

Heart Inro 2

Inro – What Is It?

An Inro is a small ornamental box hung from the sash of a kimono to hold small objects such as cosmetics, perfumes, tobacco or medicines, because traditional Japanese garb lacks pockets. Inro can be made from a variety of materials including wood, ivory, bone, and lacquer (and polymer clay of course :). They evolved over time from a utilitarian article into objects of beauty and craftsmanship.

I have been playing with a technique I call Scrap Mokume Gane and I love that I can use it to make colorful pattered Inros. Ironically enough, the Mokume Gane technique is also Japanese in origin. Translated it means “wood eye metal”. Many layers of different precious metals are laminated together. The stack (or billet) is then cut or carved into to create a pattern. The metal is then flattened into a thin sheet and used for jewelry, household objects, etc.

My Inros do not have the traditional look of Mokume Gane, but I love the designs and colors I get from using scrap clay as the base and rubber stamps or texture sheets for the design. Look to my past posts for a link to my short tutorial on making the Scrap Mokume Gane sheets.

Inro 1

Inro 1

Inro 2

Inro 2

Inro 3

Inro 3

Inro 4

Inro 4

How to make a sheet of Scrap Mokume Gane

Each time they turn out different

Each time they turn out different

Click on the link for my tutorial.

http://www.tonjastreasures.com/tutorials/scrapmg.html

Playing with Scrap Clay

I accidentally discovered that scrap clay can be used to make a very colorful version of Mokume Gane (aka Hidden Magic). I was trying to mix a pile of scrap clay into a solid color and got to a point where the color was so interesting I just could not keep rolling the sheets of clay through the pasta machine. My favorite rubber stamp was laying there and I wondered what it would look like to texture the sheet and trim it like I would when I make mica shift.

I couldn’t believe my eyes as I started trimming off the raised areas. There was this colorful, almost watercolor looking, design in the clay. What a discovery. 🙂 After a creative dry spell I found my muse again. I spent the next week rolling my scrap clay into sheets, covering anything that didn’t move and a made few other goodies, too. LOL

They have mini sewing kits inside

They have mini sewing kits inside

Cuff Bracelet

Cuff Bracelet

Pens

Pens

More Pens

Pens

Wearable Vessel

Wearable Vessel

With the lid off

With the lid off

Perfume Atomizers

Perfume Atomizers

There are many more but I won’t bore you with the rest of the pictures. LOL

My Amazon Shop

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