Flickr Finds For July

Found some fabulous,newly uploaded pictures.

Flowermouse Design

Flowermouse Design


Viktorya Slutsky / DaliDesigns

Viktorya Slutsky / DaliDesigns


silverpepper23

silverpepper23


malodora  / DDee Wilder

malodora / DDee Wilder


Anat Goldich

Anat Goldich


Marie Pierre / grecoaica33

Marie Pierre / grecoaica33


lacigalecristalline

lacigalecristalline

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Waste Not Want Not Focal Beads

In a previous post I said I was setting aside the mokume gane shaving for another project. I used the term “waste not want not”, so I figured it was the perfect name for these beads. 🙂

I used black clay as the base and layered those shaving over the surface until I has a pleasing design. On most of the beads that had black clay still showing I textured the black to give the bead an extra kick. I got the inspiration from Kellie’s Robinson’s beads. I haven’t sanded or buffed them yet and I may not. The picture doesn’t do them justice. They are much prettier in person. My favorite is the red/orange/yellow bead. (They are all approx 1″ across, with a single hole straight through the bead)

wnwnbeads

Inro – What Is It?

An Inro is a small ornamental box hung from the sash of a kimono to hold small objects such as cosmetics, perfumes, tobacco or medicines, because traditional Japanese garb lacks pockets. Inro can be made from a variety of materials including wood, ivory, bone, and lacquer (and polymer clay of course :). They evolved over time from a utilitarian article into objects of beauty and craftsmanship.

I have been playing with a technique I call Scrap Mokume Gane and I love that I can use it to make colorful pattered Inros. Ironically enough, the Mokume Gane technique is also Japanese in origin. Translated it means “wood eye metal”. Many layers of different precious metals are laminated together. The stack (or billet) is then cut or carved into to create a pattern. The metal is then flattened into a thin sheet and used for jewelry, household objects, etc.

My Inros do not have the traditional look of Mokume Gane, but I love the designs and colors I get from using scrap clay as the base and rubber stamps or texture sheets for the design. Look to my past posts for a link to my short tutorial on making the Scrap Mokume Gane sheets.

Inro 1

Inro 1

Inro 2

Inro 2

Inro 3

Inro 3

Inro 4

Inro 4

How to make a sheet of Scrap Mokume Gane

Each time they turn out different

Each time they turn out different

Click on the link for my tutorial.

http://www.tonjastreasures.com/tutorials/scrapmg.html

Playing with Scrap Clay

I accidentally discovered that scrap clay can be used to make a very colorful version of Mokume Gane (aka Hidden Magic). I was trying to mix a pile of scrap clay into a solid color and got to a point where the color was so interesting I just could not keep rolling the sheets of clay through the pasta machine. My favorite rubber stamp was laying there and I wondered what it would look like to texture the sheet and trim it like I would when I make mica shift.

I couldn’t believe my eyes as I started trimming off the raised areas. There was this colorful, almost watercolor looking, design in the clay. What a discovery. 🙂 After a creative dry spell I found my muse again. I spent the next week rolling my scrap clay into sheets, covering anything that didn’t move and a made few other goodies, too. LOL

They have mini sewing kits inside

They have mini sewing kits inside

Cuff Bracelet

Cuff Bracelet

Pens

Pens

More Pens

Pens

Wearable Vessel

Wearable Vessel

With the lid off

With the lid off

Perfume Atomizers

Perfume Atomizers

There are many more but I won’t bore you with the rest of the pictures. LOL

My Amazon Shop

Purchase your Polymer Clay books from my Amazon.com Associates Shop and save money. If you have Amazon Prime they ship free. http://astore.amazon.com/polcor-20